27 - 29 June 2018
Hall 11, Amsterdam RAI, The Netherlands

Conference Programme



Day 1: Wednesday 27 June

Keynote Presentations
09:00 - 11:00

Moderator

James Fanshawe
Chairman
UK MASRWG
UK

09:00

The future of maritime autonomy: an operators perspective

P Michael A Rodey
Senior innovation manager
A.P. Moller-Maersk A/S
DENMARK
This presentation will provide attendees with a perspective of the future direction of autonomous shipping from the point of view of the world's largest shipping company. It is a must attend presentation for attendees keen to understand the drivers and requirements necessary for widespread adoption of autonomous shipping.

09:30

Advancing maritime autonomy – global ecosystem activities

Päivi Haikkola
Ecosystem lead
DIMECC
FINLAND
One Sea - Autonomous Maritime Ecosystem was founded in 2016 as a cooperative effort of seven marine and ICT companies. During 2017 the ecosystem has established a test area for autonomous vessels and assisted the IMO in understanding where the industry currently stands on autonomy. In 2017-2018 the plan is to create a project to enable remote piloting, research on maritime connectivity and a demonstration project on autonomous ships. The ecosystem is also working for industry-approved levels of autonomy. The ongoing research and other activities will be presented, together with the direction the cooperation alliance has taken.

10:00

Government/industry partnerships to speed up autonomous ships to market

Raphaël Fabian
EU affairs officer
Rolls-Royce
BELGIUM
As autonomous ship technology advances more rapidly than ever could have been expected, its deployment to market will need to be supported by the appropriate regulatory framework, both nationally and globally. Talking to governments is crucial, not only to secure the needed legislation but also to unlock research capability and R&T funding, as well as to manage growing social and environmental concerns. These are all key to boosting the speed of autonomous ships to market.

10:30

Gradual development towards autonomous ships

Dr Kalevi Tervo
Global programme manager
ABB Marine
FINLAND
When looking at the road towards autonomous shipping, it is anticipated that in the majority of ships the computer will not take over the responsibility of operation before the general public, industry, operators, owners and officials have learned to trust the new automation solutions. ABB sees the transition towards autonomous shipping happening gradually, step by step starting from assisting solutions for specific operations; when all stakeholders learn to trust that the most recent step delivers the benefits, the next step can be taken. This presentation will discuss the most recent results and case examples in ABB's in development towards autonomous ships.

11:00 - 11:30

Break

11:30 - 13:00

Panel Discussion: Developing autonomous shipping

Matthew Crane
Head of maritime technology and innovation
Government Department for Transport
UK
Raphaël Fabian
EU affairs officer
Rolls-Royce
BELGIUM
Johan Gahnstrom
Senior marine manager
Intertanko
UK
Svein David Medhaug
Project manager
The Norwegian Maritime Authority
NORWAY
Mike Piskur
Programme manager
Great Lakes St. Lawrence Governors & Premiers
USA
Erik I Tvedt
Special advisor, technical regulation
Danish Maritime Authority
DENMARK
Louise Hall
Loss prevention director
The Shipowners’ Protections Limited
UK
Moderators:
James Fanshawe, chairman, UK MASRWG

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch

Navigation and Positioning Challenges
14:00 - 17:30

Moderator

James Fanshawe
Chairman
UK MASRWG
UK

14:00

Connectivity, autonomous navigation system and a combined simulator for research

Dr Marko Höyhtyä
Senior scientist, research team leader
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd
FINLAND
A critical component of any unmanned and autonomous ship is the wireless communication system supporting efficient and safe operation in any environment. This talk highlights the connectivity challenges of an autonomous/unmanned ship defining the high-level architecture and the required subsystems. We will describe our ship handling simulator, focusing especially on how it can be used for safety validation of autonomous navigation systems. Finally, we will discuss our combined simulator that includes a connectivity component to study effects of packet losses and delays on safe operation.

14:30

Sense and avoid in high-traffic areas

Bruno Sourice
Unmanned surface vehicle architect - SIREHNA
DCNS Research
FRANCE
One of the main problems in the implementation of a USV is her capacity to navigate in safe conditions. Navigation becomes critical when the traffic is dense, especially near harbour. SIREHNA proposes a solution based on multiple sensors acquisition and on multiple avoidance algorithms to avoid collision. The approach tested at sea is to take advantage of each sensor technology and combine them with different avoidance strategies. The result is improvement of the USV manoeuvres at low and high speeds modelled on human behaviour.

15:00

Different navigation strategies for an unmanned vessel

Sigurd Underhaug
Project manager intelligent vessel projects
Wärtsilä Ship Design Norway AS
NORWAY
Autonomous or unmanned vessels will need to use different strategies for navigation and control. This paper will give an overview of different strategies and technologies that can be used in different parts of a sea voyage. It will also explain how vessels could operate in emergency situations with and without communication with a remote control centre.

15:30 - 16:00

Break

16:00

Towards a framework for assurance of autonomous navigation systems in the maritime industry

Andreas Brandsæter
Researcher
DNV GL
NORWAY
We discuss potential assurance frameworks for autonomous navigation systems in the maritime industry, with emphasis on testing and verification of the systems perception performance and capacities. Ongoing research in this field has revealed profound challenges related to artificial situation awareness and machine perception specific to the marine environment. The lack of a clear and transparent framework and methodologies to assure the safety associated with the usage of such solutions, have been identified as key barriers for the implementation of autonomous navigation solutions at scale. Because the machine perception and situational awareness algorithms are expected to be partly or fully based on machine learning algorithms, including deep learning, whose functional reasoning is challenging or even impossible to understand and predict, the verification of such systems is fundamentally different from a traditional verification process based on physical understanding and theory. We review several methods for testing autonomous navigation systems, proposed and used mainly in the automotive industry, and discuss how these methods can be adapted, combined and applied to form a framework for assurance of autonomous systems in the maritime industry.

16:30

An innovative propulsion approach towards reliable navigation and position keeping of autonomous ships.

Klaas Visser
Assistant professor marine engineering
Delft University of Technology
NETHERLANDS
Although the experiences with unmanned air vehicles, unmanned automotive vehicles and space vehicles have fuelled the expectations of the early introduction of autonomous ships, typical safe and reliable navigation requirements have to be solved. Given the absence of a crew capability to restore propulsion problems, a zero-maintenance requirement and the use of system components with very high reliability and a high tolerance to system reconfigurations are essential. The presentation will show an analysis of solutions in aerospace and automotive areas that could support autonomous ships, an analysis of (graceful) degradation control of ship propulsion systems and the introduction of very high efficient and extremely redundant propulsion components.

17:00

Autonomous marine navigation in GNSS denied environments

Geraint West
Global business manager - oceanographic
Sonardyne International Ltd
UK
The challenge of establishing an autonomous ship's position reliably in extreme and challenging marine environments such as shipping channels, harbours or at offshore energy installations, will be discussed in the context of recent GNSS jamming and spoofing events. The speaker will present preliminary outcomes from a UK Government-funded project, AutoMINDER, which extends the available positioning sensors to include new types and new integration methods, along with a standardised integration architecture that supports easy adoption. The added redundancy, diversity and support for graceful degradation to failsafe navigation will be applied to a number of unmanned and autonomous ship operations.

Day 2: Thursday 28 June

Concepts, Case Studies and Innovation
09:00 - 12:30

Moderator

Nick Lambert
Director
NL Associates Ltd
UK

09:00

The costs and benefits of various degrees of autonomy: a case study

Dr Henry Robinson
Technical director
H-Scientific Ltd
UK
This paper addresses the practical, technical and economic implications of various degrees of autonomy. Autonomy can mean anything from a simple “heading-hold” autopilot to something vastly more sophisticated – and expensive. Full “autonomy” implies being able to solve whatever problems might arise, including a host of issues such as equipment malfunction and propeller entanglement, without human intervention; but the cost of this capability needs to be more than matched by the value of achieving it. By way of example, this study considers the requirements for pipeline and reservoir surveys.

09:30

Unmanned systems evolution: from aircraft to ships

Adam Ehart
Chief engineer unmanned maritime systems
Textron Unmanned Systems
USA
Textron Unmanned Systems (formerly AAI Corporation) has continually provided unmanned aerial vehicles to the United States military since the late 1980s, transferred that technology to the maritime domain in 2007, and is currently executing the first US Navy Unmanned Surface Vessel programme of record. This presentation/paper traces the evolution from tele-operated aerial vehicles to autonomous multi-mission maritime vehicles with universal, multiple domain command and control systems. It provides an understanding of the system architecture and concept of operations necessary to support autonomous maritime operations. Emphasis is given to adapting existing manned vessels to optionally piloted vessels.

10:00

Smart Marine: the future of shipping is now

Andrea Morgante
Head of digital, marine solutions
Wärtsilä
NORWAY
The vast majority of maritime stakeholders agree that the digital transformation will have a radical impact on the industry. Yet only a few have a clear idea of where to start, and many see it as a long-term scenario. This presentation will highlight how new technologies and digitalisation are changing the maritime world today, and why the future Smart Marine ecosystem will involve connecting ‘smart’ vessels with ‘smart’ ports to enable an even more efficient use of resources.

10:30 - 11:00

Break

11:00

FernSAMS: Fully remotely controlled tugboat concept including autonomous assistance

Hans-Christoph Burmeister
Group manager - sea traffic and nautical solutions
Fraunhofer Center for Maritime Logistics and Services CML
GERMANY
FernSAMS is a German research project relating to the deployment of remotely controlled tugboats for berthing and unberthing manoeuvres of large merchant ships. It includes defining operating scenarios, designing a remotely controlled tugboat, full automation of line handling, development of communication and data exchange systems as well as an assistance system for remote operation. Test and validation is done by ship handling simulators and model boats. Industrial development partners include VOITH and MacGregor Hatlapa.

11:30

Demonstrating the safety case for international transits with autonomous systems

Richard Daltry
Technical director
ASV Global
UK
This presentation will focus on how ASV Global’s autonomy system is developing systems and processes to work towards autonomous international transits. As part of this, ASV Global will present the safety case for the first international transit of a powered USV, and the development and technological underpinning that will one day make this possible. With over 1,300 days of unmanned operations and many firsts within the industry, ASV Global has built a strong case history to allow for safe operations over the horizon.

12:00

Value of autonomy measured through operations on multiple commercial vessels

Michael Johnson
CEO
Sea Machines Robotics
USA
Sea Machines has deployed autonomous command systems on multiple vessels operating in various applications, working with owners and managers who have been operating vessels for generations, and who today are witnessing stagnation in the industry through continued reliance on highly manual 20th century vessel command. Smart-ship technology such as autonomous command and ship-to-shore connectivity provides immense value with new efficiencies, predictability and reduced liabilities. Sea Machines will present and discuss use cases of marine autonomy on actual vessels performing different tasks at sea and the real value to these companies as measured by multiple stakeholders.

12:30 - 14:00

Lunch

Situational Awareness and Decision Support
14:00 - 17:30

Moderator

Nick Lambert
Director
NL Associates Ltd
UK

14:00

Sea Hunter and maritime autonomous behaviours

Dr Tim Barton
Maritime chief engineer
Leidos
USA
Leidos has worked with the US DARPA and the US ONR on DARPA’s ACTUV programme to design and build Sea Hunter, the technology demonstration vehicle that ONR is further developing through the Medium Displacement Unmanned Surface Vessel (MDUSV) programme. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the programme and vessel, maritime autonomy architecture, behaviours and missions, and recent efforts in autonomous survey and autonomous logistics. The views, opinions and/or findings expressed are those of the author(s) and should not be interpreted as representing the official views or policies of the Department of Defense or the US Government.

14:30

Sensor design choices for precise manoeuvring and situational awareness

Russ Miles
Chief technical officer
Guidance Marine Ltd
UK
Whether we’re talking about a fully autonomous vessel or advanced mariner assistance systems, we need position sensor data for two different purposes: first for route finding and collision avoidance; second for precise manoeuvring. These two purposes bring different requirements in terms of accuracy, sensitivity and coverage. We look at how this has worked out in sensor choice and design in recent developments at Guidance Marine for precision manoeuvring support systems incorporating radar, lidar and cameras. We report on practical experience with automated operations and mariner assistance on vessels in service.

15:00

Autonomous ship technology – a new approach to sensor visualisation

Ralph Dodds
Programme lead, innovation and autonomous systems
Atlas Elektronik UK Ltd
UK
One of the greatest challenges posed by increasingly complex maritime autonomous shipping is the ability of operators to evaluate the data that their sensors provide. Traditional flatscreen displays often increase the workload to the point that single operators are unable to assimilate all of the information presented and thus compromise their decision-making ability. Atlas Elektronik UK, working with the University of Birmingham on behalf of the UK Ministry of Defence, has been developing new, 3D visualisation techniques drawn from the world of virtual reality to improve situational awareness from multiple sensors and enhance the human operator’s decision-making process.

15:30 - 16:00

Break

16:00

Verification of the communication environment for remote control of ships

Prof Etsuro Shimizu
Professor
Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology
JAPAN
Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology has been developing remotely controlled autonomous boats since 2014. A wireless LAN and a mobile phone network are adopted as a communication method between the boat and the remote station onshore. The communication quality of both networks is examined at Tokyo Bay. The required communication quality to operate ships is also discussed.

16:30

Autonomous vessels and why humans remain in the loop

Vegard Evjen Hovstein
CEO
Maritime Robotics AS
NORWAY
As we move into more autonomous vessels, the reality is that it will still be some years before fully autonomous/self-managing vessels are able to handle any situation. Technology is pushing boundaries, but technology needs certification standards for autonomous operation. Who is to blame when an autonomous vessel sails into a small kayak? Autonomous actions within a constrained set is probably what we could expect shortly, and the human still needs to be in the loop and have situational understanding as if he or she were on the bridge. The presentation will show how the operator of USVs can achieve this.

17:00

A self-awareness system for autonomous ships

Dino Mandic
Founder and CEO
SailRouter BV
NETHERLANDS
In this talk we present a performance monitoring and prediction system for autonomous ships. We use a wave recognition system that computes directed wave parameters using sensor fusion of the data measured from retail onboard MEMS devices. The sensor fusion algorithm is based on a neural network approach and computes from measurement the characteristic wave height, the significant wave period and the encounter angle of a ship with a running sea. Based on reconstructed wave parameters we obtain predictors for key operability and safety performance parameters of a ship. We propose this as a self-awareness system for autonomous ships.

Day 3: Friday 29 June

Best Practices
09:00 - 12:30

Moderator

James Fanshawe
Chairman
UK MASRWG
UK

09:00

Interaction between manned and unmanned ships

Dr Sauli Ahvenjärvi
Principal lecturer
Satakunta University of Applied Sciences
FINLAND
An important aspect of the introduction of autonomous ships is the interaction between manned and unmanned ships. After the introduction of autonomous ships there will also be manned sea-going vessels operating in the same traffic areas. What kind of impact will the interaction between manned and unmanned ships have on the rules, procedures and general safety of seafaring? What has to be taken into account regarding technology, training of seafarers, methods and forms of communication, and even standardisation of the behaviour of autonomous ships, to ensure smooth interaction between vessels, good predictability and maximum safety?

09:30

Inmarsat – Autonomous Ship

Stein Oro
Vice president
Inmarsat Maritime
NETHERLANDS
The future of connected ships lies in highspeed networks such as Fleet Xpress, which guarantee the app-triggered bandwidth to support the autonomous ships of tomorrow. To meet regulatory, safety and security needs alone, communications must be accurate, scalable and support the multiple systems to achieve redundancy. Broadband connectivity supports the real-time decision-making, remote monitoring/control and automated processes that will support the emergence of the autonomous ship. In this presentation, Inmarsat will explore how satellite communications are already being used to trial the behaviour of complete autonomous ship systems and consider their consequences for regulation, cyber security and seafarers.

10:00

The mariner in the age of automation

Gordon Meadow
Associate professor/chair MASSIG IMarEST
Southampton Solent University
UK
Prof John Cross
Professor
Marine Institute of Memorial University
CANADA
It is widely acknowledged that the mariner’s role will change with the coming of autonomous and unmanned ships. This will result in the elimination of some established skills as well as the development of new ones, which will inevitably cause changes in the required courses for mariners. The presentation will examine future training course requirements for ships' officers and present recommendations in the form of potential modifications for IMO model courses. Recommendations result from careful task analysis and further draw upon the experiences of ships' officers, crucially identifying the skill requirements of both the ship and the mariner of the future.

10:30 - 11:00

Break

11:00

Strategies for the realization of autonomous vessels in Korean shipyards.

Dr Sewon Kim
Senior researcher
DSME (Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering)
KOREA
Korean shipyards and government are preparing a economical and technological paradigm shift towards autonomous shipping seriously. This presentation gives the technological issues those the Korean shipyards facing for a realization of autonomous vessel. Simultaneously, the technological strategies for those issues will be addressed. In addition,this presentation introduce the efforts of Korean shipyards and government to enhance a precision of a performance estimation for an autonomous vessel by using realistic design, environments, and voyage data. Joint research project which was conducted to estimate the performance of the autonomous vessel, would be presented.

11:30

Autonomous vessels on inland waterways

Ann-Sofie Pauwelyn
RIS project leader - smart shipping
De Vlaamse Waterweg NV
BELGIUM
In order to continue to support the modal shift from road to water, automation is a very important topic for the inland waterway sector. Automation can play a big part in creating a well-functioning mobility network. De Vlaamse Waterweg NV – the Flemish inland waterway authority – has the ambition to enable the use of commercial unmanned ships on the inland waterways by 2020. In this presentation the steps already taken, and the ongoing and future activities to reach that goal will be presented.

12:00

USVs in narrow channels – obstacle avoidance systems developments

Aditya Nawab
CEO
Robosys Autonomous Unmanned Systems Ltd
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
Obstacle avoidance in narrow channels for USVs presents major challenges requiring novel solutions. Robosys has developed a number of methodologies to provide solutions that are both robust and reliable. Several details of this technology and examples of implementation on new test vessels are discussed.

12:30 - 14:00

Lunch

Legal and Regulatory Frameworks
14:00 - 16:00

Moderator

James Fanshawe
Chairman
UK MASRWG
UK

14:00

Rolls-Royce autonomous COLREG-compliant collision avoidance – breakthrough result analysis of latest collaboration studies

Iiro Lindborg
General manager – remote and autonomous operations
Rolls-Royce
FINLAND
Compliance with current and future regulations is instrumental in the wide-scale exploitation of unmanned vessels at sea. Furthermore, satisfactory autonomous operation in accordance with the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea 1972 (COLREGs) is pivotal to maritime safety. With this in mind, Rolls-Royce has been developing autonomous COLREG-compliant collision avoidance in collaboration with industrial and academic partners. This development is further reaching than the state of the art and therefore more robust to the real world; it is also seafarer-like for smoother adoption into service.

14:30

Autonomous ships – how to clear the regulatory barriers

Bjarke Holm Hansen
Attorney
CORE Advokatfirma
DENMARK
The presentation will contain key conclusions and recommendations from CORE Advokatfirma's 'Analysis of the Regulatory Barriers for Autonomous Ships'. It was carried out as an advisor to the Danish Maritime Authority and will be submitted as an information paper to the IMO MSC 99 in May 2018 in connection with the 'Regulatory scoping exercise for the use of Maritime Autonomous Surface Ships (MASS)' undertaken by IMO's Maritime Safety Committee. The presentation will touch upon the following topics: navigations and seaway regulations; manning and role of future 'seafarers' and shore controllers; protection of the marine environment; construction and design of ships; liability and insurance; cyber security and anti-terror. The focus will be on providing a common 'language' for discussing regulatory barriers for autonomous ships internationally, namely in relation to the definition of 'autonomous ships' and 'autonomy levels' as well as in the approach to key regulatory issues. Recommendations as to potential solutions to the regulatory barriers/challenges will be included as well.

15:00

Beyond Colregs – wider legal considerations associated with autonomous vessels

Mark Johnson
Counsel
Reed Smith
UK
Autonomous shipping is not far away. The smart ship is expected to revolutionise the landscape of ship design and operations. However, before the revolution becomes a reality, the legal and regulatory framework needs to be considered to allow for the safe operation of vessels. Particular consideration needs to be given to where the distinction between the ‘technical’ and ‘human factor’ will blur; the more autonomous the vessel, the more likely it is that product liability issues will arise. Mark Johnson will highlight some of the legal challenges that need be addressed

15:30

Autonomous vessels on the not-so-distant horizon: a regulatory framework analysis

Sean Pribyl
Attorney
Blank Rome LLP
USA
The United States Government is only now beginning to comprehend the benefits and risks of autonomous vessels, including the legal issues regarding their operations and necessary port infrastructure. This presentation will provide an overview of the rapidly developing implementation of automated technologies in the US maritime industry, including those related to autonomous vessels. Moreover, it will provide a critical overview of the international best practices, current legal regime and standards under which autonomous vessels must operate. It will also discuss the rapidly growing interest in autonomous vessels in the United States, a key player in international maritime developments.
Please Note: This conference programme may be subject to change

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